Tag Archives: 1960’s

1960’s ‘Doctor Who’: ‘The Dalek Invasion of Earth’ Commentary & Narration

This is me explaining some of the key features, elements and references in the 1960’s ‘Doctor Who’ serial ‘The Dalek Invasion of Earth’. This is the second story in which The Daleks appeared on TV screens. I go into how certain aspects of it appeal to a certain audience, how humour is used, and how different characters are represented in different ways amongst other things including how popular culture references certain historical things in real life i.e. The Daleks in ‘Doctor Who’ and the Galactic Empire and the Stormtroopers in ‘Star Wars’ could be compared to Nazism. For Example, the Nazi party’s swastika has similarities to both the Galactic Empire’s logo in the ‘Star Wars’ movies but also the Sith Empire’s logo in ‘The Old Republic’.


Batman Focus Group Results

Here is our main findings that our group discovered while undertaking this focus group about 1960’s Batman and modern Batman ‘The Dark Knight’.


Batman Focus Group Clip

 


Genres: How They Have Changed Over Time Powerpoint Presentation Slides

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‘Doctor Who’: Stereotyping, Presence, Absence, Closed, Open, Multi-Strand & Single-Strand

The characters in ‘Doctor Who’ are quite stereotypical in a way. Also the absence of some characters in some episodes (such as Barbara’s absence in some episodes e.g. an episode of ‘The Sensorites’, and The Doctor’s absence in some episodes e.g. an episode of ‘The Keys of Marinus’) is explained by Barbara being up on a ship above a planet and The Doctor being in a different location. This is so the actors and actresses could have a holiday break.

The content in an episode can be closed or open and it can be either single-strand or multi-strand. I think single-strand means a single story and multi-strand means a story arc.

The presence of characters like The Doctor changes things as people get happy and are excited to see him as they know The Doctor is here to save the day and they know he will save it at any cost. It’s not just the characters on screen (his companions and his friends) that are excited and happy to see him, but also the audience watching the TV at home.


‘Doctor Who’: ‘The Dalek Invasion of Earth’: Episode 1: ‘World’s End’ Analysis

Essentially the episode starts off with the title sequence and then it goes into a scene with a Roboman walking into the River Thames. Then it cuts to a shot of The TARDIS materialising and then cuts again to shot inside The TARDIS where The Doctor is pressing, pushing and pulling loads of knobs and dials on the console after his flips his handkerchief all over it to dust it off.

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Selection & Construction of Content, Modes of Address, Codes & Conventions

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‘Doctor Who’ is much more colourful nowadays than it used to be. Obviously when it first started off it was in black and white but even when it went into colour in the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s, it still wasn’t as colourful as it is now. Also the fonts used are a lot moreĀ prominentĀ and bold on screen and they stand out more, not just in the title sequence, but in recent episodes it has even given the year and the location away at the start of the episode in the form of bold text. Obviously in the title sequence the font is much larger and centered as that information is more important than the year and location information, which is small and at the side of the screen. In the title sequence you don’t just have the ‘Doctor Who’ logo, but also the name of the episode and the name of the writer after the ‘Doctor Who’ logo has been displayed, and the actresses and actors names before the ‘Doctor Who’ logo is displayed. Target audience comes into it too, as when ‘Doctor Who’ first started it was quite moody, dark and mysterious whereas nowadays it’s more cheerful and it has more comedy elements, and the colours and font being different in the program over the years were used to reflect this.

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Target Audiences, Focus Groups & Update 2 on the Critical Approaches/Responses Unit

The target audience for Adam West 1960’s ‘Batman’ is families but it appeals more to kids than it does adults. It enjoyed a prime time slot in the USA during the 1960’s and it was repeated in UK in the 1970’s also at prime time. It lasted for three seasons. Not as much violence was allowed in the 60’s as it is n0w and that is why the decision was made to make ‘Batman’ have camp and comedic elements in it. It was originally intended to be a serious program back in the 60’s but over the years this has changed and nowadays it has sort of adopted the role of a sitcom. Another reason why it had camp and comedic elements in it was because of the target audience so the content in the show was fit for viewing and fit for purpose and the screen.

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Update 1 on the Critical Approaches/Responses Unit

First of all one of our original ideas has slightly changed. Originally, we were just going to show focus groups 1960’s ‘Batman’ and ‘Doctor Who’, but now it appears that we might show them modern day ‘Doctor Who’ and ‘Batman’ too. This is to get a larger comparison between the two as some people might forget some elements of the modern versions. Also we might show it to people who aren’t fans of them and/or people who have never seen them before. Probably most people will think they are rubbish before they watch them, but after they have watched them they will probably like them.

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Proposal

What my group proposes to do is create some surveys and questionnaires. Some of these will be face to face, others will be condcuted online i.e. on Survey Monkey and the link would be posted on Facebook.

We would then probably get a focus group of people together who have watched ‘The Dark Knight’ and show them Adam West 1960’s ‘Batman’. We could get another focus group together too of people who have watched modern ‘Doctor Who’ and show them 1960’s ‘Doctor Who’ if we have time.

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