Tag Archives: Target Audiences

Target Audiences, Focus Groups & Update 2 on the Critical Approaches/Responses Unit

The target audience for Adam West 1960’s ‘Batman’ is families but it appeals more to kids than it does adults. It enjoyed a prime time slot in the USA during the 1960’s and it was repeated in UK in the 1970’s also at prime time. It lasted for three seasons. Not as much violence was allowed in the 60’s as it is n0w and that is why the decision was made to make ‘Batman’ have camp and comedic elements in it. It was originally intended to be a serious program back in the 60’s but over the years this has changed and nowadays it has sort of adopted the role of a sitcom. Another reason why it had camp and comedic elements in it was because of the target audience so the content in the show was fit for viewing and fit for purpose and the screen.

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Comparison between two media products/programs: ‘Hollyoaks’ & ‘Doctor Who’

In a program such as ‘Doctor Who’, the language is mostly formal but it can be informal sometimes. In a program such as ‘Hollyoaks’ the language is mostly informal but can be formal sometimes. There is very little swearing in both programs (unless you count the late night spin off ‘Hollyoaks Later’). Slang isn’t used much in both programs, but it’s used more in ‘Hollyoaks’ than it is in ‘Doctor Who’.

Also target audience comes into it too. The target audience of ‘Hollyoaks’ is mostly teenagers. The target audience of ‘Doctor Who’ is mostly families, fans of the show, science-fiction, fantasy, drama, action and adventure fans. Also most of ‘Doctor Who’s’ audience are intellectual as the program itself is quite intelligent with the length of the words and sentences it uses and it’s fast paced nature, also it’s complicated and confusing plots, some of them everyone will understand, some of them no one will understand, and some of them only certain people will understand (mostly fans who have seen most episodes, even the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s ones). ‘Doctor Who’ is much more complicated and confusing nowadays than it used to be.

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Update 1 on the Critical Approaches/Responses Unit

First of all one of our original ideas has slightly changed. Originally, we were just going to show focus groups 1960’s ‘Batman’ and ‘Doctor Who’, but now it appears that we might show them modern day ‘Doctor Who’ and ‘Batman’ too. This is to get a larger comparison between the two as some people might forget some elements of the modern versions. Also we might show it to people who aren’t fans of them and/or people who have never seen them before. Probably most people will think they are rubbish before they watch them, but after they have watched them they will probably like them.

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‘Doctor Who’ Video Clip 2: ‘Journey to the Centre of the TARDIS’ (Modern Day) (Formal)

In this second clip from ‘Doctor Who’, which was taken from a modern day episode called ‘Journey to the Centre of the TARDIS’, The Doctor is played by a young actor called Matt Smith. It was broadcast last Saturday on BBC One so it is really recent.

Back in the 1960’s the BBC was much more formal than it is now, and due to BBC standards things like the squeezing of cheeks would not be acceptable back then but obviously nowadays it is because it happened in this clip.

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‘Doctor Who’ Video Clip 1: ‘The Dalek Invasion of Earth’ (1960’s) (Formal)

This is a clip from 1960’s ‘Doctor Who’ from the end of a serial called ‘The Dalek Invasion of Earth’.

It shows The Doctor played by an old man (William Hartnell) saying goodbye to his companion and grandaughter Susan Foreman (played by Carole Ann Ford). Susan is unwillingly staying with a person called David Campbell to spend the rest of her life with him and to probably get married and have kids with him.

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